New York Chef Jordan Frosolone Brings Back ‘Ancient Pastas’

In a city deeply rooted in age old tradition, where heritage holds true, and the mettle of a chef is tested everyday, Chef Jordan Frosolone of 10 Corso Como is breathing new life into Italy’s storied pasta making history. Applying old school Italian techniques, Chef Jordan brings history to the forefront to resurrect and refresh pasta recipes that date back centuries. By taking this singular approach to Italian fare, you are sure to find a unique and authentic experience seldom found at most Italian places. Their ever-changing menu takes you through various regions of Italy that inspired these “ancient pastas” to be brought back into the spotlight.

Since 2003, Chef Jordan has worked as a Chef de Cuisine at Hearth, and more recently, the Director of Culinary Operations for the Momofuku Group in New York. At 10 Corso Como, Chef prides himself with creating an approachable dining experience that is unrivaled in quality and attention to detail. The thoughtful use of sustainable, seasonal ingredients, and fresh pasta milled in-house guarantees an immersive Italian episode you won’t soon forget. Located in Manhattan’s Seaport District, the space is refined, trendy and distinctive; a complement to the fine-dining experience.

With respect to tradition and the desire to develop a deeper understanding of Italian culture and cuisine, Chef Jordan spent two years in Florence and Spoleto, Italy to cultivate his own philosophy of authentic Italian cooking. It was his time there that drew him to the lore of forgotten traditional recipes that were once commonplace hundreds of years ago.

For example, the “Pasta Struncatura” on the menu is a multi-grain pasta from the Calabria region of Southern Italy, known to be the poorest. Historically, this pasta was made from whatever scraps or “sawdust” leftovers were available from the floor of the grain mill, typically put together with anchovy paste to compensate for taste. Also, the “Pasta Suddhi,” is a dish made using barley flour. The use of the robust barley grain is uncommon in today’s practice and was typically used when other grains were scarce.

When asked about his motivation in resurrecting these ancient techniques of pasta making, Frosolone said: “It’s a fascinating history… it is great being able to explore the culture and learn how these communities thrived. I wanted to gain a better cultural understanding and a grasp of its significance firsthand.”

Chef Jordan’s inspiration is drawn from the land itself. He creates multifaceted dishes that portray Southern Italy’s different regions; serving pasta indegenous to certain areas. It becomes a subtle history lesson, a beautiful case study on the Italian experience, if you will.

“We highlight simplicity above all, without bringing anything unnecessary to the table.” Says Chef Jordan. While these dishes are unique and modern in their creation, they stay confident in their roots. It can be seen that these dishes are a true testament to the history of the art of pasta making — walking the line of tradition and innovation.


Article by Raphael Madrid for FOODBEAST. Read the original article here.

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