10 Sneaky Foods That Aren’t as Healthy as You Think

Unless you’ve been living under a rock or exclusively follow foodporn accounts on Instagram, you may have noticed the #fitspo lifestyle has completely taken over.

From Fit Tea brand ambassadors to self-identified wellness models, ~healthy living~ has become a fad that’s showing no sign of slowing down.

And while you may think you’re ready to hop on this bandwagon, I’m here to warn you that many of your favorite “healthy” foods aren’t as healthy as you think.

So before you commit to a life of early morning workouts and sponsored micro-influencer posts, here are 10 foods you think are healthy, but are actually just as deceiving as the puppy Snapchat filter.

Dried Fruit

Photo: zeevveez on flickr, CC BY 2.0.

Dried fruit may be a more nutritional snack option than say a luscious piece of chocolate cake or microwaved nachos, but sadly that doesn’t mean it’s healthy. Dried fruit contains large amounts of added sugar that makes it, nutrition wise, much more similar to candy than actual fruit.

Dried fruit may be a more nutritional snack option than say a luscious piece of chocolate cake or microwaved nachos, but sadly that doesn’t mean it’s healthy. Dried fruit contains large amounts of added sugar that makes it, nutrition wise, much more similar to candy than actual fruit.

Veggie Chips

Photo: George Kelly on flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0

Though it seems like this should be illegal, just because something contains a variation of the word “vegetable” in its name doesn’t mean it’s healthy. Veggie chips are fried like normal potato chips and are high in sodium and fat. *Insert facepalm here*

Peanut Butter

Photo: Mike Mozart on flickr, CC BY 2.0

If you’ve ever fit the archetype of “broke college student” you’ve likely had many a meals that consisted of just a jar of peanut butter and a spoon. You may have considered this a healthy detour from your usual diet of pizza and microwaved mac & cheese, but truth is, that’s not quite the case. Peanut butter along with other nut butters have sugar added in the form of high fructose corn syrup making the “healthy” snack option really not.

Canned Soup

Photo: crayolarabbit on flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

Consider this good news: You no longer need to eat a sad bowl of canned soup in the name of health. Turns out that cheap, canned grocery store soup is loaded with high amounts of sodium that is not only unhealthy, but can leave you feeling bloated and lethargic. If you genuinely enjoy eating soup, opt for homemade, it’s generally quite simple to prepare.

Trail Mix

If you’re like the majority of society, when you eat trail mix you meticulously pick out the M&M’s and little mini chocolate peanut butter cups leaving the raisins, nuts and other ~less than~ ingredients aside. Not too surprisingly, this results in a sugary treat that lacks substantial nutritional value. For a healthier alternative, look for trail mixes made up of unsalted nuts, a little fruit and even perhaps a bit of dark chocolate.

Instant Oatmeal

Extremely high in both carbohydrates and sugar, instant oatmeal may be quick and easy to make, but sure isn’t healthy. Try making your own if you’re craving the ooey gooey breakfast staple for a more nutritious option. Or ya know, just yolo eat a bacon, egg & cheese.

Flavored Yogurt

If you dismally eat yogurt while your coworkers enjoy morning treats like bagels or breakfast burritos in the name of nutrition, put the plastic spoon down now. Flavored yogurts are are made sweet with loads of added sugar and are thus not as great for you as you might suspect. Unfortunately, plain yogurt is a much healthier choice, but feel free to throw some fresh fruit on top for a little bit of natural flavor.

Granola

Photo: rusvaplauke on flcikr, CC BY 2.0

Though granola often appears on the “lighter fare” section of brunch menus, it’s really not that much better for you than some of the more inherently tubby options. A serving size of granola is a lot smaller than you probably think, so filling an entire cereal bowl with the sweet breakfast treat isn’t doing your beach bod any favors. It contains a significant amount of sugar so it’s better enjoyed when lightly sprinkled on top of yogurt or fruit than consumed in mass by itself.

Bran Muffins

Photo: judam6 on flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

The sad but very real truth about any type of muffin is that they’re essentially cupcakes without frosting. Sure, some are slightly better than others, but even muffins’ most healthy iteration isn’t all that healthy. Yes, even bran muffins, despite their nutritional sounding name, are still filled with high amounts of sugar and fat. They also often contain more wheat flour than actual bran when purchased at a bakery or coffee shop.

Veggie Burgers

Photo: Kathryn Wright on flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0

Though not all veggie burgers are created equal, some are pretty darn bad for you. Too often, store bought veggie burgers contain high amounts of sodium and not as many vegetables as you might think. Most are made with rice, beans and are held together by a variety of oils and veggie proteins.


Article by Elisabeth Brier for FOODBEAST. Read the original article here.

food beast

Related Posts